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College Board

Homepage Home > Testing > Students with Disabilities > Application Process > Documenting Specific Disabilities > Learning Disabilities

Learning Disabilities

What documentation is needed to substantiate learning disabilities?

To be eligible for accommodations on College Board tests, a student with a disability must provide documentation that meets the College Board's Guidelines for Documentation, including evidence of functional limitation. See

When a student has a learning disability, he or she should have a comprehensive assessment and documentation relating to both cognitive ability and academic achievement. If a student is requesting extended time, it is also helpful that he or she provide documentation relating to his or her ability to test in a timed setting. When submitting documentation to the College Board for review, the student should include the full psychoeducational or neuropsychological evaluation, including scaled/standard scores.

As a general guide, tests used to diagnose learning disabilities should have the following characteristics:

  • Comprehensive cognitive and academic assessment
  • Individually-administered
  • Nationally normed
  • Be administered under standardized conditions

The College Board does not accept "brief" measures, such as the KBIT-2 or WASI.

What are some commonly used tests/measures where a student has a learning disability?

Please note that the following list is not exhaustive:

Commonly used tests that measure a student's cognitive abilities:

  • Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) or Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-IV)
  • Woodcock Johnson Psychoeducational Battery-III NU (WJ-III NU): Tests of Cognitive Abilities
  • Stanford Binet Intelligence Scales-5th Edition (SBS) (When individually-administered)
  • Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test or Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (KABC-II)
  • Differential Ability Scales, Second Edition (DAS-II)
  • Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales

Commonly used tests that measure a student's academic achievement:

Reading

  • Woodcock-Johnson-III NU: Tests of Achievement (General and Extended batteries that include fluency measures)
  • Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults (SATA)
  • Stanford Diagnostic Reading Tests, Fourth Edition (SDRT) (When individually-administered)
  • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT II) with reading rate measure
  • Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement, Second Edition (KTEA-II)
  • Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests® (GMRT®) Fourth Edition (When individually-administered)

Mathematics

  • Woodcock-Johnson-III NU: Tests of Achievement (General and Extended batteries including fluency measures)
  • Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults (SATA)
  • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test II (WIAT II)
  • Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement, Second Edition (KTEA-II)
  • Stanford Diagnostic Mathematics Test, Fourth Edition  (When individually-administered)

Written Language

  • Woodcock-Johnson-III: Tests of Academic Achievement (General and Extended batteries including fluency measures)
  • Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults (SATA)
  • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT II)
  • Test of Written Language III (TOWL III)
  • Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement, Second Edition (KTEA-II)

When a student requests extended time, the student should also provide documentation of a test that measures the student's academic skills in a timed setting. See extended time for a list of commonly used tests. See Computer for required documentation that is required when the computer is requested.

Commonly used tests that measure a student's information processing:

  • Detroit Tests of Learning Aptitude-4 (DTLA-4) or DTLA-A (Adult)
  • WISC IV
  • WAIS-III
  • W-J-III-Tests of Cognitive Ability

A low processing speed score alone, however, usually does not indicate the need for testing accommodations. In this instance, what would be important is to include in the documentation an indication of how the low processing speed affects a student's overall academic skills. 

Tests not accepted by the College Board

The following tests are screening tools and, without other measures, do not meet the psychometric criteria to diagnose a disability or establish the need for testing accommodations:

Cognitive

  • WASI
  • Reynolds Intellectual Screening Test (RIST)
  • Slosson Intelligence Test-Revised
  • KBIT-2
  • Woodcock-Johnson III - Brief Intellectual Ability (WJ-III-BTI)

Academic

  • Wide Range Achievement Test 4 (WRAT 4)
  • KTEA-II Brief Form

Please note that the list is not exhaustive.

Customized Entry Pages

HIGHLIGHT

Now you can request accommodations online.

SSD Online System - thumbnail image

Sign in to SSD Online Disabilities Accommodation Management System.

Documentation Needs

Under what circumstances must documentation be provided to the College Board? See Documentation Requirements.

What documentation must be provided when a computer is requested? See Accommodations.

Contact

  • Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD)
  • College Board SSD Program
  • P.O. Box 8060
  • Mt. Vernon, Illinois 62864-0060
  • Phone: (609) 771-7137
  • FAX: (866) 360-0114
  • TTY: (609) 882-4118
  • Email: ssd@info.collegeboard.org
  • Phones are available between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. (Eastern Time), Monday through Friday. You may also contact PSAT/NMSQT, SAT or AP for specific information about each program.

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