In order to bring you the best possible user experience, this site uses Javascript. If you are seeing this message, it is likely that the Javascript option in your browser is disabled. For optimal viewing of this site, please ensure that Javascript is enabled for your browser.
Jump to page content Jump to navigation

College Board

Homepage Home > K–12 Services > All In

All In

AP Potential - All In

Reach Out to a Student about AP

All In is the College Board’s effort to unify and amplify the efforts of educators working to eliminate the barriers that these students face and to ensure that 100% of African American, Latino, and Native American students with AP potential enroll in at least one matched AP class.

Pledge to Be a Part of All In

Despite years of hard work from dedicated and committed education professionals in every part of this country, far too many students of color who have the potential to succeed in AP classes are not enrolled in those classes. As educators, we can’t condone such wasted potential, and as a country, we cannot afford it.

Why All In? In the 2013 cohort alone, only 9% of African American students who took the PSAT/NMSQT were identified as having AP potential. Within that small group, over half the African American students with AP potential did not enroll in any AP courses. What’s more, half of those students went to schools where AP classes were offered.

Together we can — and must — do something to move the needle now and eliminate barriers for students with potential.

Join us in the effort and sign up today.

National Number of AP Exams by Ethnicity (excluding Spanish Language)

Customized Entry Pages

HIGHLIGHT

Pledge: be a part of All In

See: David Coleman's letter on All In

Read: Unfulfilled Promise: African American Male AP Participation Gap

Share AP: access resources to help introduce students to AP

Find: use the AP Potential tool to identify students likely to succeed in AP

What College Board Members are Saying and Doing

Teaching in an independent school our socioeconomic diversity is no where near traditional urban schools.  With that said, I would think that programs that prepare students for the rigor of AP, like pre-AP coursework would be beneficial for not only skill development but also for student confidence.  When students believe that they can do the work required, and have the skills to support that belief, I think it's a recipe for success.” 

-   Mr. Mark A. DiGiacomo, Pennington, NJ 

Back to top